Janitorial companies serve their customers in a variety of measurable ways ” eliminate dust, maintain floors, clean spillage and eradicate mold to name a few. However, one of the most important challenges facing janitorial companies is what cleaning technicians can’t see during their cleaning programs ” cross contamination. This occurs when bacteria is spread between people, food, surfaces and equipment. Contaminants are found at a 500% higher rate indoors than outdoors where Americans spend on average almost 90% of their time this is particularly alarming. While these statistics are notable, well-trained janitorial companies can eradicate this issue in a variety of ways.

Proper janitorial training is the first line of defense against cross contamination. This means that each technician should understand which cleaning techniques prevent the spread of germs to other areas of the facility. One common mistake is that multiple areas are cleaned with the same supplies and equipment and this is the leading cause of cross contamination in a facility. While other companies can be more proactive in separating their equipment/supplies while cleaning, they may fail to store them separately which is just as harmful. It’s important that restroom cleaning supplies are stored separately from general cleaning supplies and equipment, for instance. While fundamental training is a great start, janitorial companies should also provide continued education on this topic.

At the end of the day, it doesn’t matter how clean how facility looks ” what matters is how safe and healthy your facilities are for your staff and customers. The right tools, equipment and training can help meet these new janitorial standards. We hope the guidelines below help limit cross contamination in your facility.

Guidelines to limit cross contamination:

  1. Properly train cleaning technicians in healthy janitorial techniques
  2. Separate restroom cleaning supplies from general equipment
  3. Restroom microfiber cleaning cloths should be color-coded to ensure they are not used in other areas
  4. Focus on entryway mats in order to prevent the spread of dirt and bacteria
  5. Janitorial staff should wear gloves when cleaning restrooms and those gloves should be discarded when the restroom is complete
  6. Sanitary cleaning should focus on facility touch-points including door handles, light switches and other common contact areas

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